Have Standards, Don’t Cut Lanyards

In some industries the standard practice is to cut the patient’s lanyard once you’ve connected to them. By pulling as much slack out of the connection as possible, the shock to the patient from cutting the lanyard is usually quite small. At first glance this seems to be a pretty desirable solution. It is simple, fast, and requires a minimum …

Amy LavinHave Standards, Don’t Cut Lanyards

Evaluating Potential New At-Height Workers: A Guest Post

Due to recent tragedies, we have decided that our usual sarcastic and satirical perspective on life should take a seat and let the depth of things sink in. We love to play around, but think it might be a good time to say when and really let the severity of recent happenings register. It is said that reflection is the greatest …

Amy LavinEvaluating Potential New At-Height Workers: A Guest Post
Lineman Safely Scaling Tower

OSHA’s New Electrical Utility Rules Translated into Laymen Terms

  Back when cassette players ran the portable musical show, when Miller Lite was the light beer of choice, and air hockey tables littered arcades everywhere, OHSA was thinking about death. They implemented their first set of workplace standards in the early 1970s, and until recently, little had changed. But, fear not, for OSHA has recently installed new specifications to measure workplace …

Amy LavinOSHA’s New Electrical Utility Rules Translated into Laymen Terms
ISC Red Back Up Device

The Red and a Rope with Tension

The ISC Red is a great back up device for rope access work. However, through some testing by a third party and by ISC, it turns out that the Red has a draw back. When it is placed on a rope with tension (during a pick off on the victim’s line for instance) the device fails to engage. To learn more, …

Jacob WallaceThe Red and a Rope with Tension